Polk County Biographies by Goodspeed

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B. F. TEETER

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 702, 703  Polk County Biographies Section

B. F. Teeter, a successful business man of Polk County, Mo., engaged in selling drugs at Half Way, was born in Collin County, Texas, July 3, 1849, and is the son of Jacob and Sarah Ann (Weedin) Teeter, who were born in St. Charles and Cooper Counties, Mo., respectively. The former was born in 1812 and died in 1870, still survived by his wife, who resides in the county, and is now in her sixty-first year. They were married in Cooper County, and moved from there to Texas, and in 1848 located in Collin County, where they resided until 1855, then took up their abode in Denton County, coming in 1865 to Polk County, Mo. The father was a successful farmer throughout life, and was an earnest worker in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, his wife being a member of the same, but she is now a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.   The Teeters are of German descent, the paternal grandfather having come from Germany to the United States, locating first in Kentucky, and later in St. Charles County, Mo. The Weedin family are English. B. F. Teeter is one of five children born to his parents the names of his brothers and sisters being: Mary E. (Barham), William J., Rebecca A. (Keeling), and Nancy E. (Hood).  B. F. Teeter received his early education in the common schools of the "Lone Star State," and after his father's death, remained at home managing affairs for his mother until he was twenty-four years of age, at which time he went to Mason County, Ill., where he was engaged in farming for one year. He then returned to Polk County, Mo., and, after farming for two years, entered a general mercantile establishment, with which he was connected for seven years, and, after remaining idle for nearly one year, opened a drug store at Half Way, which he has since successfully conducted. In March, 1886, he was appointed postmaster of the place, and is now faithfully discharging the duties of this office.  He is a Democrat in politics, and is secretary of the Masonic lodge, of which order he is a member. He also belongs to the I.O.O.F. On the 24th of January, 1878, he was married to Nancy L. Brock, a daughter of Lewis Brock. She was born in Knox County, Tenn., in 1857, and has borne six children, five living: Ora O., Treva M., Maude I., Grover C. and Andre. Gertrude died in childhood.                              ~~>TOP<~~


JOHN A. THOMAS

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 703, 704  Polk County Biographies Section

John A. Thomas, a prominent farmer of Marion Township, was born in North Carolina Mary 17, 1821, and is the youngest of seven children, four sons and three daughters, born to John and Elizabeth (West) Thomas, natives of North Carolina, where they were reared and married. The parents remained in their native State until about 1836, when they moved to East Tennessee, and there spent the rest of their days, both living to a good old age.   He was a farmer by occupation, and was a very successful one; was a Whig in politics, and was a first-class citizen in every respect. The mother was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. John A. Thomas spent his boyhood days on his father's farm, and received no educational advantages, not even being able to read or write. After remaining with his mother until twenty-two years of age, he began for himself by engaging in tilling the soil.  In 1843 he married Miss Mary Weese, a native of Roane County, Tenn., and about a year younger than her husband. About 1846 they moved to Fulton County, Ill., and the following year to Carroll County, Ark., where they remained until 1862, when they came to Polk County, Mo., with his family. In November, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, First Arkansas Cavalry, U.S.A., and served until August, 1865; was in the battle of Prairie Grove and many skirmishes. While trying to remove his family from Carroll County, Ark., he was surprised by a squad of bushwhackers, was shot Through the left arm, shattering the bone, and the are has always given him trouble. Had not some of his neighbors been in the squad, he would undoubtedly have been killed; as a compensation he receives, a pension of eight dollars per month. After the war Mr. Thomas joined his family in Polk County, and here he has since remained. After coming here he rented land for about seven years, and since then has become the owner of 320 acres, but at present has but 240 acres. He has eight children: Martha, Hughey, Eliza, William, Catherine, James, Mary and John. Mr. Thomas has been a hard working man all his life, and has accumulated considerable property. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and is a Republican in his political views.                                      ~~>TOP<~~


EUGENE D. TINGLE

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pg. 704--Polk County Biographies Section

Eugene D. Tingle, editor and proprietor of the Humansville Bee,  and attorney at law at Humansville, is a native of Maryland, born at Snow Hill, Worcester County, July 4, 1840, and is the son of Judge William and Sallie Marie (Williamson) Tingle.  Judge Tingle was a native of Maryland, and occupied a seat on the bench of the twelfth judicial district for over twenty years.  He died at Snow Hill in his sixty-ninth year.  Judge Tingle was a son Capt. Daniel Tingle, who was a sea captain, and who perished on his  ship, which was supposed to have been burned at sea by pirates.   Daniel Tingle was also supposed to have been a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and was the son of an English gentleman, who made a home for himself in America.   Sallie Maria (Williamson) Tingle was the daughter of Rev. Stewart Williamson, a Presbyterian divine, and a prominent man in that church in early times.  He was a native of Pennsylvania.  Eugene D. Tingle grew to manhood in his native State native State, completed a literary course of study at Newark Academy, Delaware, and his legal studies were finished at the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia.  He practiced law for a few years at Snow Hill, Md., and in 1869 came to Shelbyville, Mo., where he practiced his profession for quite a while, serving as superintendent of schools of Shelby County for several years.  He was married at Shelbyville, Mo., to Miss Mary C. Boettcher, a native of Missouri, and a lady of education and refinement, being a graduate of the Christian College of Columbia, Mo.  To Mr. and Mrs. Tingle were born two children, Thomas Rackliffe Fassitt, and Willie (deceased).   In December, 1888, Mr. Tingle came to Humansville, Mo., and started the Weekly Bee, a Democratic paper, which is a spicy sheet, full of news and useful information.  Mr. Tingle has traveled extensively in the interest of newspapers and real estate, having been a correspondent for different interests.

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HARRY D. TRAIN

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 704, 705--Polk County Biographies Section

Harry D. Train, of the Ewert  & Train Charcoal Company, Fair Play.  Among the many business men of Fair Play deserving of mention Is the subject of this sketch, who was born in Minnesota, April 5, 1860, and moved with his father to Kansas City in 1870.   There he attended the public schools for four years, and at the age of fourteen years entered the employ of one of the largest dry-goods firms in the city as cash boy; and at the end of six years was employed by that firm, receiving a salary of $3,000 per year. He subsequently left their employ, and engaged in real estate business in Kansas City in 1880, where he remained until 1887, his real estate business proving a grand success, and he realized over $100,000 from it. In 1886 he was elected a member of the city council and served two years. In the fall of 1887 he came to Fair Play and purchased a half-interest in the charcoal plant for $15,000. He also opened a lumber yard, a general merchandise Store, and a bank, of which he is cashier. In the spring of 1887 he purchased the entire stock of the charcoal company, and incorporated it with a capital stock of $50,000. Mr. Train is in every way a substantial citizen and a shrewd business man.   He was married to a Kansas City lady, Miss Dora Freeland, in 1881, And one child, Harry, was the result of this union. Mr. Train is the son of H. C. and Maria E. Train; the father, now living, is seventy-five years of age, but the mother received her final summons September 8, 1871. H. C. Train is at present city inspector of Kansas City. He is a wagon-maker by trade and was in partnership with the proprietor of the Bain wagon. Of the seven children born to this union, there were five sons and two daughters. The paternal grandfather was born in Southern New York, but became a pioneer of the northern part of that State, and there died. The maternal grandfather, John Bullene, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and the name can be traced back to Queen Ann Boleyn.  

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JOSEPH TUCK

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pg. 705--, Polk County Biographies Section

The origin of the Tuck family is traced back to two brothers who, at an early day, emigrated from England to the United States, and settled in Virginia. From one of these brothers descended Joseph Tuck, who was born in Halifax County, Va., July 4, 1800, and when seventeen years of age moved with his parents to Blount County, Tenn., where, January 13, 1825, he married Miss Elizabeth Bond, a native of that county, born in October, 1809.   In 1835 they moved to McMinn County, Tenn., remaining there until 1837, when they came to this county, and located one and a half miles west of Brighton. There the mother still lives. The father died May 25, 1887. He was an industrious, well-to-do farmer, and a good citizen. He and wife became members of the Methodist Episcopal Church about 1825, and he was a Democrat in politics.   In their family were ten children, six sons and four daughters; of these one son and one daughter are dead, and one son lives  at Willits, Cal., and one at Sherman, Texas. The others are citizens of this county, and are members of the Methodist Church, South, and Democrats in politics.

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HENRY C. TURK

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 705, 706, Polk County Biographies Section

Henry C. Turk. In sketching the life of this gentleman, it is but just to say that his career through life has been irreproachable. His birth occurred in Hickory County, Mo., April 27, 1850, his parents, Andrew and Mary (Williamson) Turk, having been born in Roanoke and Floyd Counties, Va., respectively.  When a young man the father came to Missouri, and, after residing for about five years in Hickory County, came to Polk County, where he made his home until his death, March 13, 1870, at the age of fifty-nine years, his birth having occurred on the 1st of March, 1811.  The mother was born in 1821 and died June 1, 1863. She came with her parents, James Williamson and wife, from Virginia to Hickory County, Mo., in 1844. After her death Mr. Turk espoused Mrs. Jane Williamson, who is now a resident of Hickory County.  He was a machinist and millwright by trade, which occupation he learned in Ohio, but, after coming to Missouri, gave the most of his attention to farming, at which he was quite successful. He was a member of the Baptist Church, a Royal Arch Mason, and, by his first wife, became the father of five children, four of whom are living: Sarah, wife of J. H. Payne; Ellen, wife of J. H. Payne, Jr.; Virginia, wife of J. W. Viles; Frances, the deceased wife of Reuben Long, and Henry C. To his last union one son was born, Solon, who is living with our subject. The latter was educated in Bolivar Academy and at home, and, when starting out in life for himself, it was as a farmer and school teacher, but for a number of years past has given his entire attention to farming and stock dealing. His land is very fertile, and is well adapted to stock purposes, being plentifully supplied with water.  In 1876 Mr. Turk acted as assessor and census enumerator, and in 1880 was United States census enumerator in Green Township. In 1882 he was elected assessor, and two years later was nominated county representative by the Democratic party, but, on account of sickness, resigned. January 26, 1873, he was married to Maria F. Robinson, a daughter of Rev. Jehu Robinson. She was born in Webster County, Mo., in 1855, and is the mother of four children, only two living: Pearl and Earl. Andrew J. and Charles A. are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Turk are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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WILLIAM UNDERWOOD

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 706, 707, Polk County Biographies Section

William Underwood. Prominently identified with the farming and stock-raising interests of Polk County, Mo., stands the name of Mr. Underwood, who was born in Roane County, Tenn., October 29, 1840, and is the son of Enoch and Sally (Owens) Underwood. Enoch Underwood was born in Spartinburgh district, S. C., in 1802, and was the son of John and Jennie (Utley) Underwood. He moved at an early age with his parents to Roane County, Tenn., and there attained his majority. He was married in that county, and there remained engaged in farming until 1842, when he emigrated to Polk County, Mo., where he still continued agricultural pursuits.  He was a member of the Christian Church and died in Polk Co.,  February 16, 1879. His wife, Mrs. Sally (Owens) Underwood, was born February 22, 1802, in Roane County, Tenn., and grew to womanhood there. By her marriage she became the mother of seven children, four now living. Mrs. Underwood is still living, and is a member of the Christian Church. The paternal grandparents were natives of Tennessee, and died in Roane County of that State. They had ten children. The paternal grandfather, Edward Owens, was probably born in Virginia or Carolina. He married Elizabeth Sumpter in Virginia, and afterward moved to Tennessee, where they received their final summons. They were the parents of twelve children, only one now living. Elizabeth Sumpter's father William Sumpter, lived in Virginia, and there married Miss Margaret Hoskins. He was a brother of old Gen. Sumpter, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, under Gen. Washington. William Underwood, subject of this sketch, came with his parents to Polk County, Mo., in 1842, and grew to manhood in that county. He received his education in the common schools, but ill-health prevented him from advancing very far in his studies. He was married in March, 1866, to Miss Martha Fox, daughter of John and Jane (Wollard) Fox. Mrs. Fox was born in Polk County, Mo., May 28, 1846, and grew to womanhood in that county. She became the mother of fourteen children by her marriage, thirteen now living: Sarah Jane, now Mrs. Crane; Margaret A., Enoch S. (deceased), John F., James C., Willima M., Thomas W., Lizzie M., Esther Pearl, German N., Dolly, Robert M. and Gracie C. (twins), and Benjamin H. In 1862 Mr. Underwood entered the Union army and served three years. After the war he returned to Polk County, where, as mentioned above, he was married. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the following orders: A.F. & A. M., K. of P. and the G.A.R.  He and wife are members of the church. 
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CHARLES A. WALTERS

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 707, 708, Polk County Biographies Section

Charles A. Walters, one of the proprietors and managers of the Brighton Flouring Mills, was born in Berks County, Penn., in June, 1838, and is the son of John W. and Margaret (Tyler) Walters, the father born in Germany, and the mother in Switzerland. John W. Walters was a machinest by trade, and when a young man went to Switzerland, where he met and married Miss Tyler. Soon afterward they came to America, and after living for some time in Philadelphia, moved to Berks County, where he ran a farm in connection with his shop. In 1870 they came to this county and here spent their last days. In their family were seven children, five sons and two daughters, the second child being Charles A. Walters. He assisted his father with the duties on the farm, received a common school education, and when seventeen years of age learned the miller's trade, but, as trade was dull, he helped repair several mills, and thus took up the mill-wright business. In 1858 he came to Illinois; and milled there until 1870, when he moved to Springfield, and worked at carpentering for about two years, after which he came to this county. He then worked on the farm and at the carpenter trade until 1875, when he and two brothers built a saw-mill, and, about two years later, put up a flour-mill, with a capacity of thirty barrels per day. His brothers having withdrawn from the business, the firm took the present title. In addition to the mill, Mr. Walters is the owner of 147 acres of land. In 1876 he married Miss Ellen Emlet, who bore him two children: George and Blanche. Mrs. Walters is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Although Mr. Walters has met with reverses in business, he is now in a prosperous condition and has a good property.  When President Lincoln made the first call for troops, Mr. Walters enlisted, but as there were to many, his company was not taken for some time, and so he returned to his work. Politically he has been a Democrat until 1888, when he voted for Gen. Harrison. He is a Mason.

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JOHN BENTON WANN

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 708, 709, Polk County Biographies Section

John Benton Wann, M. D., a native Missourian, was born in Lawrenceburg, Lawrence County, on the 27th of December, 1847, and is a son of Daniel and Sarah (Hague) Wann, who were born, reared and married in Tennessee. In 1824 they made a settlement in Lawrence County, Mo., where the father engaged in tilling the soil. He served as a soldier from Tennessee in the Mexican War. His father, William Wann, was a Virginian, who after the Revolutionary War settled in Tennessee. The Wanns were presumably of Scotch extraction, and were of large stature, strong physique, and long lived. Dr. John B. Wann was the fifth child and second son of seven children, and grew to manhood in Cass County, where he obtained a good common school education, and farmed until his twenty-third year. He then gave up farming for a time, and spent several years in traveling, trading, and otherwise occupying himself throughout the Western States and Territories. In 1876 he returned from Oregon to his home, and began giving his attention to the study of medicine, graduating from the Missouri Medical College, at St. Louis. He had, in the meantime, practiced medicine, and after graduating located at Humansville, Polk County, where he is regarded as one of the leading members of the medical fraternity. He is a member of the Polk County Medical Society, is a stockholder in the Highland House property, and a member of the Blue Lodge in the Masonic fraternity. He was married to Miss Julia McFall, in Lawrence County, Mo., but she died in Oregon in full communion with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, leaving him a son and daughter: Addie and Elmer. He married his second wife also in Lawrence County.  Her maiden name was Miss Susie A. Wilkerson, and she was born in Arkansas, being a daughter of James and Lydia (Messick) Wilkerson.  They have one son, Homer. Doctor, and Mrs. Wann and their two eldest children are members of the Christian Church, in which he is an elder.

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LEWIS WARREN

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pg. 709, Polk County Biography Section

Lewis Warren. Prominent among the many noted farmers and stock-raisers of Polk County, Mo., stands the name of the above gentleman, who was born in Robinson County, Tenn., December 30, 1846, and is the son of Jackson and Winnie (Shaw) Warren, both natives of Tennessee, the father born in 1816, and the mother about three years later. After marriage, the parents lived in Tennessee until 1851, when they came to Polk County, Mo., and there made their home. The father's chief occupation in life was speculating in land, although he also carried on farming, and he was a very successful business man.  In politics he was for some time a Whig, but later a Republican. He was a member of the Methodist Church, as is also the mother, who is still living. In their family were four children, two sons and two daughters, the youngest of whom is Lewis Warren.  Like the average country boy, he assisted his father in tilling the soil, and attended the common schools, where he received a good practical education. At the age of twenty years, he began farming for himself, and November 17, 1867, he married Miss  Nancy Brown, a native of Polk County, Mo., born September 4, 1849, and the daughter of Rev. William Brown. The fruits of this union were nine children, six now living: Lavenia, Winnie, Riley, Lillie, Zula and Opal. Mr. Warren is a Republican in politics, is a good farmer, and an honest, upright citizen. In 1869 he moved to the place where he now lives, and where he has 370 acres of land, all the result of his own labor.

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JAMES H. WATKINS

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 709, 710, Polk County Biography Section

James H. Watkins, another citizen whose chief industry is farming and stock raising, and who now resides three miles northeast of Fair Play, Mo., was born May 11, 1845, in Sumner County, Tenn., and is the son of Philip M. and Laura C. (Lay) Watkins, and the grandson of Robert Watkins, who died in Tennessee. Philip M. Watkins was born in Kentucky, in 1797, and emigrated at an early age to Tennessee. He married Miss Lay in 1825, she being, probably, a native of Kentucky, born in 1808. Thirteen children were born to their marriage, seven now living. The father was a soldier in the War of 1812, under Jackson, and was in the battle of New Orleans.  He and family moved to Polk County, Mo., about 1849, and here he was engaged in tilling the soil, which he continued until his death, which occurred April 4, 1879, in Polk County. The mother also died in that county, in August, 1884. J. H. Watkins attained his majority in Polk County, Mo., and, like the average country boy, received his learning in the common schools. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in Company D, Eighth Regiment Missouri State Militia, and was mustered out, on account of disability, at Jefferson City, in January, 1865. He was wounded at Jefferson City, in October, 1864, by a rifle ball in his right ankle. After he returned to Polk County he was married, in January, 1874, to Miss Hulda Pickle, of Polk County. She was born in Tennessee about 1849, and came to Polk County, Mo., at an early age, where she married Mr. Watkins, and bore him eight children, seven now living: John W., William L., George E., Louisa C., Mary E., Albert (deceased), Finia Q, and James C. Mr. Watkins is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and also of the Knights of Pythias. In his politics he affiliates with the Republican party. 

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JOHN WHILLOCK

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 710, 711, Polk County Biography Section

John Whillock, proprietor of the National Hotel, and also the owner of a livery stable at Humansville, Polk County, Mo., was born in Washington County, East Tennessee, in 1827. His father, Enoch Whillock, was probably a native of Tennessee, and was married in that State to Miss Lucinda Irvin, who was of Irish descent, but was probably born in America. The father was a farmer by occupation, was a prominent politician, and a much respected citizen. He died in Jefferson County, Tenn., as did also the mother. They were the parents of twelve children, six sons and six daughters, John Whillock being fifth in order of birth. The paternal grandfather, John Whillock, was born in England, and emigrated to America, locating in Tennessee. The maternal gradparents were natives of Indiana, and emigrated to Tennessee, where they died in Washington County. John Whillock, the subject of this sketch, grew to manhood in Tennessee, and was there married to Miss Harriet E. Gilbreath, a native of Roane County, of that State, born in 1837. The emigrated to Missouri in 1856, locating three miles north of St. Clair County, but later came to Polk County, and have lived there ever since, with the exception of two years. During the Civil War Mr. Whillock took up arms in defense of his country, in the Fifteenth Missouri Cavalry, and served three years and four months. He received his discharge at Springfield, Mo., and still has the papers in his possession. He was at the battle of Big Blue, also in many others, and was in the battle of Newtonia just before he received his discharge. After the war he returned to his home, and farmed and kept hotel, commencing the latter business in 1863, and still continuing it at Humansville. He owns 472 acres of land in Polk and St. Clair Counties, and also owns considerable town property. He is a Republican in his political views. Mrs. H. Emaline Whillock is the daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Henry) Gilbreath. Thomas Gilbreath was a native of Scotland, who emigrated to America, locating in Tennessee, and there spent the remainder of his days.  He was a powerful man physically, and was a prize-fighter or pugilist. While fighting in a ring in Tennessee he had a blood-vessel broken, and died from the effects. After this his wife went to the Louisiana Purchase, and was there married to a man by the name of Dunlap, and by whom she had ten children. She was the mother of two children by her union with Mr. Gilbreath, Mrs. Whillock being the younger of the two. The mother died in Tennessee.  The paternal grandmother of Mrs. H. Emaline Whillock was a native of Ireland, who emigrated to America at an early date, and was among the pioneer settlers of Tennessee. He died in that State. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Whillock was married in East Tennessee in 1856, but previous to her marriage had been engaged in the hotel business, which she has since followed, and with great success. She attends to all the business herself, and is a lady thoroughly qualified to fill that position in a satisfactory manner. Mrs. Whillock is now fifty-two years of age, and is pleasant and sociable in her intercourse with the public. She has with her, at the present time, the first hired hand she ever employed. She has two acres of land in the center of the town, and meditates turning it into an orphans' home.

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LA FAYETTE WILCOX

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 711, 712, Polk County Biography Section

La Fayette Wilcox, one of the old and prominent citizens of Polk County, Mo., was born in Cabell County, W. Va., October 23, 1837, his parents being Erasmus D. and Jane (Stamps) Wilcox, natives, respectively, of Massachusetts and Virginia, the former's birth occurring in 1803 and the latter's in 1811. The father left his native State when a young man and went to Virginia, where he met and married Miss Stamps, and resided until 1844, when he came to Polk County, Mo., and located in what is now Benton Township, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits, his capital at that time being very limited. He was also engaged in selling Seth Thomas clocks, and, too, followed steam-boating on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers as captain. In 1856 he turned his stock farm over to his sons and embarked in mercantile pursuits on Lindley Creek, which he continued until his death. October 16, 1861, when he was killed by Federal troops, he having been a captain of a company in the Confederate army. He was a finely educated man and was very successful in every enterprise in which he engaged, being one of the wealthy citizens of the county at the breaking out of the Rebellion. For many years he had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and was always very liberal in his contributions to churches and schools. He was a life-long Democrat. To him and his first wife, who died in Polk County, Mo., March 3, 1846, were born seven children, five of whom are living: R. H., a farmer of Audrain County, Mo.; William A., a resident of Bolivar; Cornelia, a resident of Texas; La Fayette; and Albert, a farmer of Boone County, Mo. His second wife, whose maiden name was Nancy Smart, bore him two children: H. B., a farmer of Boone County, Mo., and Mary J., a resident of Taylor County, Iowa. His last marriage (to Miss Martha Batton) resulted in the birth of a daughter, Irena, who resides in Carroll County, Ark. His widow is also residing there. La Fayette Wilcox received his rudimentary education in the common schools of Polk County, and finished his education in Danville College in Virginia.  After completing his college course he returned to Polk County, Mo., and turned his attention to farming and stock raising, which he has very successfully continued up to the present time, the property which he now has being the result of good business ability and energy, as his father lost all his property during the war. February 12, 1860, he was married to Miss Mary E., daughter of William B. Hunter, of Bolivar. She was born in Washington County, Tenn., October 28, 1842, and her union with Mr. Wilcox has resulted in the birth of quite a large family, these children living: William E., Charles S., Fanny, Minnie, Mary T., Bertie and A. J. All the sons are engaged in farming.   James, another son, died when three years of age. Mr. Wilcox is a Democrat; a member of the A.O.U.W., and is one of the highly esteemed citizens of the county. 

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WILLIAM O. WILCOXEN

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pg. 712, Polk County Biography Section

William O. Wilcoxen, of Bolivar, was born in Fulton County, Ill., February 22, 1842, being a son of James F. and Elizabeth (Bates) Wilcoxen, who were born respectively in Kentucky and Tennessee.  In an early day they settled in Missouri, where the mother still lives, the father having died while the late war was in progress.  William O. Wilcoxen received his education in the common schools, spending considerable time in work on the farm. In 1871, in connection with Mr. D. W. Faulkner, he opened a store at Brighton, this county, afterwards moving to Phillipsburg, Laclede County, and in 1880 came to Bolivar, and dealt in dry goods till 1885, when the partnership was dissolved, Mr. Wilcoxen entering the furniture and undertaking business. He also has a fine farm of 340 acres. In 1871 he married Nettie Corbin, daughter of Nathan Corbin, by whom he has three children, only one of whom is now living, Bertie. He is a Republican, a member of the I.O.O.F., and of the Christian Church, as is also his wife.

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MICHAEL WILEY

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 712, 713, Polk County Biography Section

Michael Wiley, M. D. Health is the most precious gift bestowed upon us by nature, and how to retain it, and how to regain it when lost, are matters of vital moment. Some seek for health in travel, others in physical recreation, and both are beneficial, no doubt, but do not always accomplish the object in view.   Medical science must be resorted to, and the best physicians employed. Dr. Michael Wiley, who has been very successful in his treatment of patients, was born in Jasper County, Ill., January 1, 1846, and is the fourth of eleven children born to Alexander and Louisiana (House) Wiley, natives of Cumberland County, Ky., born in 1819, and Monroe County, Ind., born in 1820, respectively.  When young, Alexander Wiley went with his widowed mother to Indiana, and there he married Miss House. He and wife then moved to St. Louis, thence to Jasper County, Ill., and in 1858 to Texas County, Mo. About this time the war broke out, and they returned to Illinois, and remained there until 1870, when they came to Polk County, and have made their home here ever since. Both are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Wiley has always been a tiller of the soil, and at this has always been quite successful. He is a Democrat in politics. Dr. Michael Wiley was reared to manhood on the farm, and received a very limited education, not attending more than ten months altogether. Later, by self-study, he has become a well informed man. He followed farming until about nineteen years of age, when he began serving an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, and remained engaged in this for nearly three years in Coles County, Ill. While at Charleston, and while building a house for Dr. Silverthorn, the Doctor said to him that he should study medicine, and that he could make a success of it.  He then read all the Doctor's books, and later went to Newton, where he studied under Dr. Frank, and afterward with Dr. J. H. Holliday,  of Alton Junction. In 1869 he began practicing, and has been engaged in this ever since. In 1870 he came with his parents to this county, but with very little means, as all had gone to pay doctor bills. He borrowed a suit of clothes to go and see his first patient, and for some time he went on foot to see his patients. In 1871, November 26, he married Miss Elizabeth V. Gasset, a native of Roane County, Tenn., born June 29, 1853, and six children were born to this marriage, three now living: Alexander, John P., and Perry B. After marriage, Dr. Wiley located in Jackson Township, and in 1882 he removed to his present home, seven miles southwest of Bolivar. He has been very successful as a physician, as his many patients now living can testify, and has, perhaps, the most extensive practice of any many in the  county. He is the owner of 122 acres of land, with eighty acres under cultivation, and is a fair sample of what can be accomplished by a young man of energy and industry. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Christian church. He is a member of the Masonic order, Odd Fellows' fraternity, and is also a member of the A. O. U. W.


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RICHARD G. WILKINSON, JR.

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 715, 716, Polk County Biography Section

Richard G. Wilkinson, Jr., a member of the mercantile firm of Furth & Wilkinson, of Pleasant Hope, Polk County, Mo., was born in Buffalo, Dallas County, Mo., January 28, 1856, and is a son of Richard and Keziah (Dodd) Wilkinson, and grandson of Richard Wilkinson, who came with his family to Dallas County, Mo., from Kentucky, being among the earliest settlers of that county. The father of our subject was engaged in farming, and teaching school in his young days, but after a time turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, and later built the mill at Buffalo. He was vice-president of the Laclede and Fort Smith Railroad, but is now living a retired life. After his first wife's death, he married Mrs. Margaret (Stambaugh) Stark, who is still living. He is a consistent member of the Christian Church, and is a Mason.  His children are as follows: H. M., engaged in farming near Buffalo, Mo.,; Martha, wife of Mr. Glasgow; Richard G.; Albert V., editor of a paper at Cambridge, Kan.; Francis M., a printer in the Reflex office at Buffalo; and Emma, wife of N. B. Huff, were born to his first marriage. John, in the mail service between Kansas City and St. Louis, and Ella, wife of Albert Miller, editor of a paper in Dakota, were the children of his second marriage.   Richard G. Wilkinson, Jr., received his education at Buffalo, and at the age of nineteen years leased some lead mines belonging to his father, which he operated for nearly two years, after which he went into the grocery business at Buffalo, and in 1875 became a clerk in the mercantile establishment of Frank Furth, continuing until 1884, when he formed a partnership with Mr. Furth, and opened a store at Pleasant Hope. Their stock of goods is valued at about $6,000, is well selected, and nets them a fair annual income. Mr. Wilkinson is a Democrat in his political views, and belongs to the I.O.O.F.

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CONAWAY WILLHITE

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 712, 714, Polk County Biography Section

Conaway Willhite, who is forward in the ranks of the live farmers and stock-raisers of Polk County, Mo., is a native of Jefferson County, Tenn, born October 20, 1826, and is the son of James and Susan (Cates) Willhite. James Willhite was born probably in Virginia, in 1790, but attained his growth in Tennessee, having removed to that State at an early age. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and soon after that eventful period was united in marriage to a Miss Baker, who died several years afterward, and sometime in the twenties he married Miss Susan Cates, a native of Tennessee, born about 1801, and the daughter of John Cates. To this union were born four children, two now living, and Conaway Willhite being the elder. About 1866 James Willhite moved to Illinois, settling in Richland County, and there died about 1880.  The mother died in Knoxville, Tenn. Conaway Whillhite left his home at the age of eleven years, went with a cousin to Iowa, where he followed farming for about nine years, and then, at the breaking out of the Mexican War, he returned to Tennessee, where, October 2, 1847, he enlisted in Company H, Fourth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, and went to Mexico with his company. He was discharged from service August 1, 1848, at Memphis, Tenn., and returned to East Tennessee in the fall of the same year, whence a few weeks later he emigrated with his father to Missouri. They located in Polk County, and there he remained until the spring of 1849, when he went with a company of men across the plains to the gold mines of California. He remained in Hamilton and Shasta Counties, Cal., for four years, engaged in mining, after which he returned to Polk County, Mo., via Central America, and reached home in the spring of 1853. Stopping there only about a year, he then returned to California with a train of cattle, and remained there until the spring of 1856, when he returned to Polk County by the former route. He was married April 19, 1857, to Miss Louisa J. Chandler, of Polk County, and settled near Bolivar, but removed to the southwest portion of the county in 1859. At the breaking out of the Civil War he was in the Home Guards until 1862, when he enlisted in Company I, twenty-sixth Regiment Enrolled Missouri Militia, as a private, and October 11, 1864, he was promoted to the rank of captain.   Afterward he organized Company E, Seventeenth Regiment Enrolled Missouri Militia, and served as its captain until the close of the war. He then retired from service by general orders in 1865, returning to Polk County, and resumed his agricultural pursuits, which occupation he has followed ever since. He takes an active interest in school matters, and, although not a church member, is also active in church matters. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. His wife, Miss Louisa J. Chandler, was born December 12, 1839, in East Tennessee, and is the daughter of John and Catherine (Nicely) Chandler,  who came to Polk County, Mo., in 1856. To Mr. and Mrs. Willhite were born ten children, eight now living: Laura A., (deceased); Charley S. (deceased); Lillian G., now Mrs. McDonald; Alonzo L., Claudius G., Alta M., now Mrs. Tarrant; Dollie V., William T. Sherman, Bennie Garfield and Harry Clide. Mrs. Willhite is a member of the Baptist Church.

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MRS. E. S. WILLIAMS

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 714, 715, Polk County Biography Section

Mrs. E. S. Williams, widow of W. J. Williams, one of Polk County's worthy residents, was born in Illinois, April 23, 1836, and is the daughter of Solomon and Mary (Hartly) Hopkins. Solomon Hopkins was born in Tennessee in 1812, grew to manhood in that State, and at and early age moved to Illinois, where he was married in 1835 to Miss Mary Hartly, also a native of Tennessee, born in 1812. After marriage the father followed agricultural pursuits, a part of the time, in Illinois, and remained there until 1836, when he moved to Missouri and settled in Cedar County, where he continued to till the soil. Some time in the forties he moved to Polk County, Missouri, and there died in 1852. They were the parents of ten children, eight of whom survive. The mother is still living on her husband's old homestead in Polk County, and is enjoying very fair health. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Williams, a resident of Tennessee, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He left Tennessee at an early date, and emigrated to Illinois, where he remained until 1836, when he moved to Polk County, Mo., and there tilled the soil until his death, some time in the forties. Mrs. E. S. (Hopkins) Williams grew to womanhood in Polk County, Mo., her early education being confined to such instruction as could be obtained in the common schools. She was married in Polk County, Mo., in 1850, to Mr. W. J. Williams, and by him became the mother of six children, four of whom are now living: Mary M., Solomon E., Sarah (deceased), Josie (deceased), Elinor U., and Addie E. Mrs. Williams has been a life-long member of the Baptist Church, and has always taken an active part in church matters since a very early age, being instrumental in building the present Baptist Church at Fair Play. Her two daughters, Miss Elinor U. and Miss Addie E., are ladies of culture and refinement, the former being an accomplished musician. They are both active members of the Baptist Church, and lovers of truth and right, and, too earnest advocates of the cause of prohibition. W. J. Williams was born in Tennessee 1828, emigrated to Pike County, Mo., in 1829, and afterward moved to Polk County, of the same State, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits. During the war he served two years in the Home Guards of Polk County. He was a member of the Baptist Church, and died in 1871. 

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RICHARD C. WILSON

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 716, 717, Polk County Biography Section

Richard C. Wilson, retired farmer, is the son of Samuel and Cynthia (Gibson) Wilson, both natives of Virginia. When young they went to Tennessee, were married there , and in 1844 they came to Missouri, where they lived in Jasper County for some time. They then moved to Arkansas, and there the mother died. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The father was a successful tiller of the soil, and was a Democrat in politics. He was killed by Confederates at his home during the war. In their family were ten children, four of whom are now living, three sons and one daughter; our subject and a twin brother are the eldest living. Two of the brothers served in the Union army. Richard C. Wilson was born September 11, 1833, in Lincoln County, Tenn., attained his growth on the farm, and received his education in the old log school-house, and also attended a term in Arkansas County, Ark.  At the age of seventeen he started from home, and worked on a farm at five dollars per month, spending his earnings in college.  In 1860 he married Miss Mary L. Hughey, a native of Carroll County, Ark., and they have three children, two now living: Riley T, and Frank C. Having moved to Texas, Mr. Wilson remained until 1863, and then went to Greene County, Mo., and was there until 1865, when he came to Polk County, Mo., and settled four miles north of Bolivar. Mrs. Wilson died in 1866, and the following year he married Miss Annie S., daughter of Clayton Devin. She was born in Obion County, Tenn., and when a mere child came with her parents to Polk County. She is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Wilson was reared under a Democratic roof, but he now holds to the Union Labor Party. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a prominent and successful citizen.  He has twice commenced even with the world--when he first began, and after the war.

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JAMES M. ZUMWALT

History Of Hickory, Polk, Cedar, Dade And Barton Counties, Missouri; 1889, published by Goodspeed, Pgs. 717, 718, Polk County Biography Section

Judge James M. Zumwalt, a native of Polk County, Mo., was born on the 17th of October, 1841, and is a son of Adam and Loretta M. (Byrnside) Zumwalt, who were born in Bath County, Va., and Pike County, Mo., July 1, 1807, and 1820 and died in Pike County in 1875 and 1885, respectively. The father came with his parents to Missouri when St. Louis was a small French village, and, after residing in several different counties, finally located in Polk County about 1837, and here spent his declining years. He was married, in Greene County, to Miss Byrnside, having been previously married, in Franklin County to Miss Mahala Sups, who died shortly after. He was a life-long Democrat, and when a young man served in the Indian wars and also the Mexican War. He and his wife were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and the Baptist Church respectively. His father, John Zumwalt, was of German birth, born in Little York, Va., and was a farmer and mechanic by occupation.  While serving in the War of 1812, he was in the battle when the  noted Indian chief, Black Hawk, was captured. While living in St. Louis he was engaged in ferry-boating on the Mississippi River.  His death occurred in Polk County. His father was born in Germany, John by name, and came to America and assisted the colonists in their struggle for liberty. Andrew Zumwalt, the latter's father, came to America at an early day, and founded the town of Little York, Va. Judge James M. Zumwalt, whose name heads this sketch, was one of seven children, and received his education in the common schools of Greene County. He remained with his parents until nineteen years of age, and, after enlisting and serving in the Home Guards for some time, joined the Eighth Cavalry Federal service, with which he remained until the close of the war, holding the rank of corporal, and participating in the following engagements: Prairie Grove, Van Buren, Big River Bridge, Chalk Bluff, Bayou Meto Bridge, Little Rock, Dardanelle, Claradon, Lewisbury, Bull Creek, and numerous others. After the war he turned his attention to farming and stock-trading, and in 1879 engaged in mercantile pursuits, being the first business man of Polktown, and has been it first and only postmaster. From 1882 to 1889 he discontinued merchandising, but at the latter date resumed business, and has been thus engaged up to the present time, his stock being valued at about $3,000. This is an excellent trading point, and he has  succeeded admirably in the accumulation of wealth. He is one of the enterprising citizens of the county, and for many years has been a Democrat in his political views, and in 1884 was elected to the office of county judge. December 6, 1869, he was married to Elizabeth Long, a daughter of Noah Long. She was born in  Davis County, W. Va., in 1852, and her union with Mr. Zumwalt has been blessed with the birth of eight children: Charles E., attending college at Bolivar; Louisa A., at home; Edward W., Lillie, James L., Pearl, May, and an infant son. Mrs. Zumwalt is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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